What Constitutes “Normal” Wear and Tear Versus Tenant DamagesAs the owner of residential real estate, it is typically expected that tenants will exert at least some amount of wear and tear on your property. Just some examples of this can include the fading of paint (both exterior and interior), small nail holes from pictures that were hung, loose door handles and / or hinges, and worn kitchen and bathroom countertops due to regular use.  In this case, even the most careful and respectful of tenants will usually leave your property with at least some amount of wear and tear. But there are other instances where the property may be left with real damages that go over and above this.

For instance, large holes in the walls from brackets or anchors, damage to doors and / or windows due to forced entry, and burned or snagged carpet are just a few examples. These are typically the result of carelessness, negligence, or even from abuse by the tenant.

While it can often take time (and money) to get a rental property back into shape, there are instances where the property owner may not have to pay for such repairs out of his or her own pocket. In fact, Florida law allows landlords and property managers to charge a tenant for damages that occur that are considered to be over and above normal wear and tear.

If making repairs to your Orlando or Central Florida investment property(ies) is taking up more of your time than you would like it to, there are ways to delegate these responsibilities – as well as the time that it takes to collect rent, find new tenants, and keep the property running smoothly.

This can all be handled by an experienced property manager. Want more information on how working with a property manager can help? If so, just give us a call today.